KU gives back through National Volunteer Week

Giving back to the community is an important part of the work each Knowledge Universe employee does: be it through annual events like March to Beach or more local events around the country, there’s a sense that each center and site is committed to making their community just a little bit better. National Volunteer Week was earlier this month. Here are a few examples of the ways KU centers and sites give back.

Yorktown, Virginia, Champions raised $100 for their community outreach program benefiting children’s cancer research.

Yorktown, Virginia, Champions raised $100 for their community outreach program benefiting children’s cancer research.

Yorktown, Virginia, Champions students sold gold ribbons to raise awareness of children’s cancer. Proceeds for the ribbons, sold to classmates, teachers, and parents, went to St. Baldrick’s Foundation to assist with childhood cancer research. The entire project was student-driven: from the idea, to the donation recipient, to the goal of raising $100 through their fundraising. Students charted their weekly progress toward their goal and talked about the children their efforts would help, children they learned about through case studies Site Director Maria Williams found. Maria said children were thrilled to reach their fundraising goal. “They know in their hearts they were helping out,” she said.

In Portland, Chief Marketing Officer Gail Galuppo recently presented a check to long-time KU partner The Children’s Book Bank at a Portland Trail Blazers game. The Children’s Book Bank is an organization that donates new and used books to children in low income families. The donation was given in partnership with the Trail Blazers (remember our Read BIG initiative?).

Dani Swope (right), founder and executive director of The Children’s Book Bank, accepts a donation from Knowledge Universe. The check was presented by KU CMO Gail Galuppo (middle) and Christa Thoeresz (left), senior director of community relations for the Portland Trail Blazers.

Dani Swope (right), founder and executive director of The Children’s Book Bank, accepts a donation from Knowledge Universe. The check was presented by KU CMO Gail Galuppo (middle) and Christa Thoeresz (left), senior director of community relations for the Portland Trail Blazers.

“We’re proud of our partnership with The Children’s Book Bank and the Portland Trail Blazers,” said David Roy, senior director of community partnerships at Knowledge Universe. “It’s always nice to spotlight our work in front of thousands of fans at a home game, but more importantly, we know our support means thousands of children who wouldn’t otherwise have access to books will now be able to start their own home libraries.”

The Grove School in Plano, Texas, also contributed to a local literacy program. According to Elle Lewis, assistant head of school, the Grove School frequently gathers donations of books and money for the Plano Family Literacy Program, an organization that’s part of the public school district works to improve literary and cultivate a love of reading for entire families. The Grove School held their book fair in March and through donations and a credit with Scholastic, they were able to give the Plano Family Literacy Program more than $500 worth of books.

How does your center or site give back to the community? Leave a comment below to share your projects and ideas.

The kindergarten class at the Seven Fields, Penn., KinderCare center was inspired to organize a month-long, center-wide food drive after reading Dr. Seuss’s Lorax book.

The kindergarten class at the Seven Fields, Penn., KinderCare center was inspired to organize a month-long, center-wide food drive after reading Dr. Seuss’s Lorax book. The line that inspired them: “Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better.”

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